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Monday, March 18, 2019

"Wolf Play" @ Artists Rep

"Wolf Play" gets off to a rough start. It begins as a metaphysical rumination on wolves, acting, theatre, and the nature of the universe. It registers as a gigantic "Huh?" This is especially unfortunate because there are some fairly important details of the plot in this rapid-fire mishmash.  However, it doesn't take long for the play to find its groove. "Wolf Play" explores the legal pitfalls of same-sex adoption, which exist even following the Supreme Court victory in gay-marriage, Much more surprising, and even less widely known, are issues involving the internet and adoption. The production is well-acted, particularly the genuinely motherly performance of Ayanna Berkshire. Despite my disappointment with its opening, I must also note that there is a harkening-back to some of the more esoteric details, which do seem to help bring the play full-circle. But, I do hope that some editing is done, as this play is world-premiere, and it is on it's way to more productions elsewhere.   

Sunday, March 3, 2019

"Tiny Beautiful Things" @ PCS

I came in completely cold to "Tiny Beautiful Things." I had not read either of Ms. Strayed's books, and only knew that the play concerned an advice column she had written.  My only thought about it was: "Oh, my mom might like this one." In other words, I was expecting a fairly light night at the theatre. Arriving on Opening Night, (sadly without my mom, who was sick, and as I predicted, quite disappointed to miss it), the woman who hands out the press-tickets gave a warning about the need for tissues. She was promptly chided for her "spoiler" by a nearby co-worker. I shrugged it off, being a seasoned-veteran of emotionally engaging theater, and even having a preference for it. The play is 90 minutes, and in the very beginning, it was approximately what I had expected. Things quickly take a serious turn, into some of the most emotionally-exhausting territory one can encounter. Consider this the warning I wish I'd had. I may not have had warning, but I did have cake at the Opening Night Reception. Cake helped. Plan to get cake. I have done you a big favor.

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

"A Doll's House Part 2" @ Artists Rep

Somewhere, I had gotten the completely mistaken impression that "A Doll's House: Part 2" was merely an update of Henrik Ibsen's original, into 1950s America. I have no idea where I got that idea, but it was part of the reason I heeded the "Spoiler Alert" heading of the essay in the playbill examining the meaning of both plays. In reality, the "Spoiler Alert" only really applies to the second-half of the essay, dealing with the modern sequel. The first-half is actually quite helpful in providing much-needed background information. As I did not possess this information until immediately before beginning this review I tended to inadvertently ignore some of the finer details of the plot (which made little sense at times), and focus instead on the jarringly intense performance of Artist's Rep Ensemble Member Michael Mendelson, and the minor role, but stellar performance of the ever-engaging Vana O'Brien. If either of those two things appeal to the more seasoned readers of this blog, who know the truth of my praise of their previous work, they may well be able to enjoy the piece on the strength of the performances alone. For everyone else, I'd recommend reading the playbill at the very least, and Ibsen's original if possible.

Saturday, January 26, 2019

"Creating Life Inside" @ Sellwood Playhouse


"Creating Life Inside" is a presentation of Rogue Pack, a sister-organization to the sadly now officially defunct Well Arts, producers of "Fierce Love"  Rogue Pack uses a very similar "collage" format, and shares the mission of telling the stories of under-represented groups on stage-in their case-focusing on youth. Their current show collects the writings of juvenile inmates at Donald E. Long Detention Center.  I was amazed by the insightfulness and general quality of the pieces, especially given the chaotic home-lives one would assume most of them endured, and a few of them actually write about, which in itself is an act of exceptional bravery in which many adults would not engage. The show itself is a very brief thirty minutes, and I really wanted more. Particularly from one searingly poetic participant, who managed to find an abundance of hope in his bleak circumstances. Much of his material is syncopated a bit like rap, but slow enough to be easily understood by those not used to the rapid-fire delivery of much of the genre.

I know I count among the readers of this website at least a handful of professionals involved in the larger theatres in the area. I assume that many of them are the kind of people who seek out work on the fringes, and if I can point them here I'd be honored to do so. Perhaps, they might also have ideas about bringing the show to a wider-audience, something the production richly deserves.




Thursday, January 24, 2019

"Teenage Dick" @ Artists Rep

Oh, what a title! For months, my brother-in-law would make pederasty jokes every time he saw a postcard for "Teenage Dick." So, when two failures of transportation made me miss Opening Night, I took solace in the fact that at least my brother-in-law would shut up if I missed it.  I then read a review posted on Artist Rep's Facebook, which reminded me that the two leads had disabilities, and not just any disability--my own. Now I had to make sure I saw it. I have never been more glad to have made the effort!  I'll make the obligatory point about "representation" being important, and the further point about the all-too-rare casting of disabled actors to play disabled characters. (Especially when Bryan Cranston smells Oscar.) Yes, seeing oneself represented is every bit as gratifying as they say, and yes it is nice to see actors with disabilities on stage. Which made me wonder why this was not mentioned in the promotional materials, I doubt I would have known at all,  had that review not jogged my memory of it being mentioned in passing at the Season Announcement Party. Next time there's a show involving disability, (please let there be a next time) emphasize it more. I saw myself a lot in Richard, and not just in the obvious way, but also in the way that the cunning nerd never gets his due, either. (I've often said that evil genius is a symptom of cerebral palsy,  no one believes me.)

Please, please, see this show. It is momentous. I will do my part to spread the word among advocacy organizations and such. "We" need to flood into shows like this, so there will be more.

Saturday, January 5, 2019

"Dial 'M' for Murder @ Lakewood

"Dial 'M' for Murder" is the kind of show where even the most cursory of plot summaries would amount to a smorgasbord of spoilers. So, let's jump right into the reasons you should see it. The title tells you everything you need to know about whether it is your cup of tea. It most certainly is mine, coming in second only to Lakewood's immediately previous production of "Inherit the Wind" as my most anticipated production of the metro-area's entire Season. In fact, the splendidness of these two shows has served to make me regret my inadvertent neglect of their shows as of late. It also must be noted that shows like "Dial 'M' are solidly in Lakewood's wheelhouse, it's always nice to see them do a show that has their "mark" as it were. Even the weather felt like a perfect complement to the show, the kind of night one might bundle in a blanket and watch its famous cinematic adaptation. In short, put this at the top of your list, it's run is rather brief.